Visit Wales tourism video; Great Britain travel guide; Brecon Beacons National Park

Visit Wales tourism video; Great Britain travel guide; Brecon Beacons National Park


Welcome back to Traveling with Krushworth. On this episode, Lizzy and I’s latest adventure
starts in Wales. We’re excited to be traveling in Brecon
Beacons National Park. History comes alive in this rough, rugged
landscape, one of the oldest national parks in Britain. Walk with us up the limestone crag to Carreg
Cennen Castle. Follow us as we hike towards the site of a
legendary lake. Then, we’ll descend into the depths of
Dan-yr-ogof The spectacular National Showcaves for Wales Wander the halls of manor home Newton House
with us as your guides and climb the highest towers of Dynevor Castle. Haunting and dramatically perched on the cliff, we approached Cerreg Cennen Castle as the last mists of morning drifted away. We were following in the footsteps of prehistoric people and the Romans who may have been first on
this high hill. Together, we stood at the imposing walls of
the ruined castle, now a jewel of the national park. While serene and peaceful today, this land has seen bloodshed. Alright, we’re in Brecon Beacons National Park And Lizzy, what are we in front of right now? So right now, we are in front of Castle Carreg Cennen And we are about to go in and show you guys Everything that we can see, climbing staircases Going up into towers. It’s going to be awesome. So, follow us, we’ll show you all the good sights. An ancient place with Urien Rheged, a Dark
Ages king and contemporary of the legendary Arthur as its mythic founder, the first documented castle at Carreg Cennen was likely built in the 12th century by the
Lord Rhys Ap Gruffydd. The structure seen today, built by King Edward
I and demolished after the Wars of the Roses, played host to
the drums of rebellion. Fierce fighting, led by Welsh independence
hero Owain Glyndwr, broke out in the early 15th century. Castles fell to the onslaught and the rebels’ swift advance trapped the denizens in a besieged
Cerreg Cennen. Take the vaulted passageway under the castle
to the cave mouth and step back in time itself, into its limestone depths. We walked into the darkness, guided only by
our lights, knowing we weren’t the first to explore
these paths, seen by the Roman coins found and the bones of four people from the end of the Last Ice Age. A place of folklore, fables say the famed
soldier Owain Red Hand sleeps under Carreg Cennen, until the time
he awakes to rally the Welsh It’s actually really cool seeing The caves underneath the castle too. And we saw some spiders as well We saw a honkin’ huge spider. So travelers, watch out for that and you’ll
most likely not be as scared as Krushworth See you later A perfect meal awaited us at the castle’s
farm and tea house. Lizzy and I both had the delicious homemade
cottage pie, made from longhorn beef, the cattle raised
on site at the farm. With such amazing dishes such as cawl, pasties
and a selection of hot drinks and cakes on the menu, let’s
just say you must eat here. You’ve found us driving straight into the
pages of the Red Book of Hergest and the Mabinogion, both medieval written accounts
of Welsh mythology. We’re going to a remote lake pulled straight
from an ages-old tale of enchantment. Those roads on the way up are crazy Had a stand off with some sheep Our sat nav actually, where did it take us too? It took us to some farmer’s farm, so we stopped by, asked for directions And ended up here. I kind of had to get out of the car in amongst 8
farm dogs. There was a tractor in the way. We made quite a scene there, but it was a lot of fun and that’s how you make friends. Exactly. Alright, back to the hike Glacial lake, Llyn y Fan Fach, is nestled
under the gaze of a knife-sharp ridge in the Black Mountain range. These beautiful, wind-swept waters bring us the legend of the Lady of the Lake, a cautionary
tale about how abuse can cost a person everything. Married to the magical being who rose from
Llyn y fan fach this allegory ends with regret and heartbreak after he struck her three times in anger. His promise to be good and kind to her, lying in ruins, she returned to the lake from whence she came but not before bearing him three powerful sons. These young men would one day grow to be known as the herbalists, the Physicians of Myddfai. We’re about to set foot in Dan Yr Ogof,
one of three fascinating caverns that comprise the National Showcaves for Wales. Soak it all in including the mesmerizing
stalactites, stalagmites and the stunningly beautiful calcite formations formed over hundreds of thousands of years. Explored for the first time by the Morgan Brothers in 1912, Dan Yr Ogof is a fascinating glimpse into our Earth’s
geologic past. While underground, we visited a small portion
of the cave system, all the while knowing something far bigger stretched out around us — 16 kilometres
of passageways. Bow your head when entering the Cathedral
Cave and experience the soaring chambers and
thundering waterfalls with us. We were blessed to visit these tremendous sites, including the third and final cavern, the Bone Cave, where 42 prehistoric human skeletons from
the Bronze Age, a 7,000 year old red deer bone along with 10,000
archaeological finds, were located. We’re in Dinefwr Park, visiting an ancient
landscape that is, in many cases, the lifeblood of Wales. Peer through history with us at Newton House, home to a dynasty of powerful leaders and
lords that has shaped this country for centuries. The 17th century manor and the sprawling grounds have long been the ancestral home of the Rice family — descendants of
the early Rhys line of Welsh princes. Today’s building exudes the power and influence of the past. We took a moment to stand at the portraits of Edward and Walter
Rice, the latter finishing the home after his brother’s untimely death. Yet, as we waked from room to room, Newton House,
a National Trust property, slowly unveiled its darker
tales to us. Our guided ghost tour started with a surprising reveal, a mummified cat in the floorboards. Placed by the Victorians to ward off evil spirits, this was a fitting
start to our foray into the supernatural. Kevin and I steeled our nerves to face the most haunted National Trust home in Wales. Our guide took us to the off limits top floor,
the old stairs creaking as we climbed. It was hard not to think about the ghosts of children — or
something darker — that supposedly haunt the stairwell. We entered the nursery where the alleged murder of the Lady Elinor Cavendish occurred. Having rejected a betrothal to a man she didn’t love, he
followed her and is said to have strangled her with her hair ribbon. Stories say the murderer, consumed with grief, then killed himself. Perhaps his spirit is that which can be seen hanging from the staircase? Even so, visitors say they’ve felt his ethereal hands tightening around their throats when they
least suspect it. As you can see, we’re still in Newton House and Lizzy and I are actually looking at the portrait of Lord Charles Talbot. He is one of the grandfather’s. Interestingly, he was painted with two left feet. There’s a trick of the light; you can see the devil over his left shoulder. We just found it; Lizzy, have you been able to find it? Yup, I can just see the face, the mouth and the two eyes. He’s a very crafty devil, but we’ve found him, so he has no power over us. Alright, so we’ll say goodbye. Bye, see you later The estate at Dinefwr has witnessed centuries
of human history. Yet, in a fascinating twist, a cattle herd
on site has long been connected with a powerful king who codified Welsh laws in
the 10th century. Hywel Dda, King of the Britons, enabled White
Park Cattle as a form of compensation for wrongs committed
against the House of Dinefwr. Today, we know this iconic breed has grazed
upon these parklands for one thousand years. Archaeologists located what remains of a prehistoric, fortified farmstead and two earth and timber Roman forts. These lands whisper about the Rhys dynasty and their shifting loyalties
to the English kings, power struggles, mythic connections, charges
of treason and Rhys Ap Thomas — a nobleman said to
have killed Richard the third in battle. Dinefwr Park, a National Nature Reserve, is worth protecting. We loved our visit, knowing that some of the trees are 700 years old. It’s here on these tranquil grounds, crowned by Newton House and Dinefwr Castle, that the story of Wales unfolds,
one chapter at a time Alright everyone, so we have been walking through the deer park and where else have we been adventuring? We’ve also been adventuring in the bogwood boardwalk Yes, it’s a little hard to say, but now we’re on our
way up to Dinefwr Castle. But as you can see, we have quite the hill to go up. Yup, alright, so onwards and upwards as they say Lizzy and I are marching straight into the past. Our destination — the towers of ancient
Dinefwr Castle. Welsh kings and princes ruled this land, fought
over for centuries after the collapse of Roman-controlled Britain. Their strength was rising, their reigns often tumultuous. One name stood out to us — Hywel Dda, who ruled from Dinefwr in the 10th century prior to
the Normans. Everything changed when Henry II granted control of south Wales to the Lord Rhys in the
12th century Ushering in the first stone castles at Dinefwr
and Cerreg Cennen. Well, this castle is phenomenal And as you can see, Lizzy is ahead of me, somewhere. It’s hard not to feel like I’m patrolling up here Like, ooh! Nah I’m just kidding. The kingdom was transformed by a
cultural renaissance of music and poetry under the Lord Rhys’ rule, but the minstrels’ songs that may have sounded in the court are now only memories. Just the wind blows here now at the site of this ruined, yet still
proud former seat of power. Upon Lord Rhys’ death, the question of his succession led to dark, violent times. Dinefwr Castle was strengthened
by subsequent princes, Rhys’ son and grandsons, before falling
to English forces under Edward I in the 13th century. For Lizzy and I, nothing was more clear to us as we explored every corner — Dinefwr Castle commanded our attention. Thank you for watching this Brecon Beacons National Park episode of Traveling with Krushworth. To follow us to Cardiff and region, click
the link to the left. Let us know what parts of Wales you fell in
love with. If you enjoyed the video, make sure you like it And don’t forget to subscribe with notifications
turned on. Thanks for watching and see you next time.

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About the Author: Oren Garnes

1 Comment

  1. Visit Wales with Lizzy and I:
    Cardiff region: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyzv7o9jaD0 😀

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